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The “Way of Love”

The “Way of Love” is a program of The Episcopal Church adapted by The Zabriskie Memorial Church of Saint John the Evangelist, Newport, Rhode Island. episcopalchurch.org/way-of-love

To download the poster, please click here.

As part of this program, we’ve also launched the St. John’s Marshall Initiative:

To sign up to help as part of the St. John’s Marshall Initiative, click here.

 

 

To see our Sunday Worship Live-Streams, click here.

 

 

You can see our daily postings here:

Saturday, April 11

On Saturdays at St. John’s, we share the Way of Love with some inspirational music curated by St. John’s Director of Music Peter Stoltzfus Berton.

Praise to the holiest in the height, a hymn that opens our Maundy Thursday service each year, comes from the poem The Dream of Gerontius by Saint John Henry Newman. In the poem, a soul dies and is accompanied by an angel through the levels of heaven.

This hymn is sung when they come into the presence of the heavenly choirs. The most famous musical setting of this
text came years after the hymn version we sing, and is considered to be the masterpiece of Sir Edward Elgar.
In this video, scroll yourself to start at 28:30. The soul hears a “grand mysterious harmony” and the angel announces that they have crossed the threshold which “utters aloud its glad
responsive chant.” The chorus that follows is just one of the most thrilling creations from any composer.

Some of Elgar’s contemporaries in 1900 hoped he’d adapt the hymn tune that everyone by then knew, but thankfully he didn’t! In it you hear the joy of the angels, responsively in two choirs back and forth, who pause to narrate the solemn reason for the celebration: that Jesus would make this same journey for our sins: “And in the garden secretly, and on the cross on high, should teach his brethren and inspire to suffer and to die.”

It’s a great illumination of the past week, concluding with its own thankful Easter. The complete text of The Dream of Gerontius set by Elgar can be found here. It is all summarized in this chorus: “Praise to the holiest in the height, and in the depth be praise; in all his words most wonderful, most sure in all his ways!”

Like and share this music with those who might need a “change of tune” to brighten their day.

 

 

 

 

Thursday, April 9

On Thursdays at St. John’s, we GO and serve others … which sometimes can be as simple as passing along an idea or piece of information.

Today, we set our service focus on the young families and children within our parish, neighborhood, and community. As part of our Marshall Initiative, we are creating a “family activity kit” to help keep young minds active, entertained and happy during this challenging time. Part of our kit will include a cooking activity made special by an added personal touch.

Are you a cooking enthusiast who treasures family recipes like heirlooms passed down from generation to generation? Do you have something special you love to cook or bake that brings back fond memories? If so, WE NEED YOUR HELP! Please jot down your recipe on an index card and mail it to the address below. Bonus: include a little note or story about why this recipe means so much to you!

ATTN: Marshall Initiative
130 Carriage Drive
Portsmouth RI 02871

 

 

 

Wednesday, April 8

At 10:00 a.m. on Wednesdays, Father Nathan Humphrey shares prayer and meditation on Facebook Live.

 

 

Tuesday, April 7

At 10:00 a.m. on Tuesdays, St. John’s shares the Way of Love and we “Learn” to see beauty and hope in everyday life.

Art is a form of storytelling. At St. John’s, our most cherished forms of art are the historic stained glass windows that shine in the light and bring us hope.

Today, we reflect on the Last Supper of Jesus and his disciples, in hopes that by reading and reflecting on Scripture, we draw near to God, and God’s word dwells in us.

You can read about this meal in all four Gospels: Matthew 26:17-30, Mark 14:12-26, Luke 22:7-39, and John 13:1-30.

Our window illustrates the principle events: the bare feet of the disciples and the jug of water speak to Jesus washing his disciples’ feet, the figure in the upper center leaving recalls the departure of Judas and his betrayal, and Jesus holding the cup and extending his hand in blessing recall our central act of worship, Holy Eucharist.

The grapes and wheat in the lower panels refer to the bread (this is my Body) and wine (this is my Blood) of the Last Supper. The top panel featuring the Crown of Thorns and the Nails of the Crucifixion foretell the coming events of Good Friday.

Call to Action: Share a smile with the community and enjoy all the smiles around us! Leave a photo of someone smiling in the comments section on our Facebook page.

You can read more about the Way of Love here: https://bit.ly/2xlZKFL

To reach out for help, or to sign up to help as part of the St. John’s Marshall initiative, please visit our link here: www.surveymonkey.com/r/GQZ7FS5.

St. John’s stained glass window photos are by Robert Fertitta.

 

 

 

Monday, April 6

“When I was a boy, and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’ ” – Fred Rogers

On Mondays, St. John’s shares the Way of Love with stories that spread compassion and hope.

Today we want to share with you what St. John’s has been doing to share the Love! Through our St. John’s Marshall Initiative, we’ve been reaching out to those in our community who could use some good cheer, sending cards and letters with messages of love and hope.

The St. John’s Marshall Initiative works by pairing the unique gifts of volunteers with the individual needs of those who need assistance.

Sign up for the initiative, here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GQZ7FS5

Or send email to volunteer@saintjohns-newport.org

 

Saturday, April 4

“Next to the Word of God, music deserves the highest praise.” — Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

On Saturdays at St. John’s, we dedicate time for rest and restoration with music curated by Director of Music Peter Stoltzfus Berton.

We’ve been inundated with musical messages in the past week, proclaiming the need to take time out for refreshment in the midst of constantly evolving bad news. It’s good advice.

This week, rather than serve as a balm or distraction, we hope this posting can connect you to the grief unfolding around us. Sometimes, a good wallow is merited as a rest from mounting pressure. And it is doubly timely for those connected to the Christian calendar, on the doorstep of Christ’s betrayal and Passion. This “song without words” is a passionate essay in texture, color and emotion.

The chaconne, a Baroque-era form of variation over a short, repetitive bass line, provides the “guard rails” to a composer’s unlimited invention. This virtuosic example from the early 1700s has been a favorite among violinists since it was rediscovered and first published in 1867.

Paired with a large kaleidoscopic pipe organ as the continuo instrument, the dramatic possibilities of the music are as fully realized as with an orchestra. Recorded two decades ago in New York City, this is a special cry to those again on the front lines of national and global catastrophe.

 

 

Friday, April 3

“When we give cheerfully and accept gratefully, everyone is blessed.” – Maya Angelou

On Fridays at St. John’s, we share the Love with generosity and acts of great kindness. Today we share with you a virtual tip jar for Newport’s hospitality staff.

Newport’s servers are among those hardest-hit by stay-at-home orders, as restaurants, bars and hotels are shuttered.

Have some change to spare? We encourage you to pay it forward, and help our friends and neighbors in need.

https://whatsupnewp.com/…/newport-county-virtual-tip-jar-h…/

 

Thursday, April 2

“Great opportunities to help others seldom come, but small ones surround us every day.” — Sally Koch

On Thursdays at St. John’s, we Share the Way of Love and “Go” forth in service. In times of social distancing, there are still many ways to love thy neighbor.

This week at St. John’s, so many individuals came forward to offer their help to those in need, from keeping our music lessons going, to offering a listening ear, to sharing supplies, to keeping in touch with those near and far.

Sign up for the St. John’s Marshall Initiative here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GQZ7FS5

Read about the St. John’s Marshall Initiative here https://saintjohns-newport.org/way-of-love/.

 

 

Wednesday, April 1

“God shapes the world by prayer. The more praying there is in the world, the better the world will be, the mightier the forces against evil.” – Mother Teresa

On Wednesdays, Father Humphrey offers prayer and meditation on Facebook Live. This Wednesday, Fr. Humphrey took inspiration from Abraham Joshua Heschel on Facebook Live, the video of which may also be found here: https://bit.ly/34aJiVb

 

 

 

TUESDAY, March 31

“A smile is the light in your window that tells others that there is a caring, sharing person inside.” Denis Waitley

At 10:00 a.m. on Tuesdays, St. John’s shares the Way of Love and we “Learn” to see beauty and hope in everyday life.

Art is a form of storytelling. At St. John’s, our most cherished forms of art are the historic stained glass windows that shine in the light and bring us hope.

Today, we reflect on The Call of James & John, in hopes that by reading and reflecting on Scripture, we draw near to God, and God’s word dwells in us.

This is the large window above the entrance to St. John’s on Washington Street. It is referred to as the Calling of James and John. James and John are in the boat on the Sea of Galilee with their father, Zebedee, mending nets, when Jesus walked by and called them. They left their father and followed Jesus. Standing behind Jesus are Simon (Peter) and his brother Andrew.

This story is told in the Gospels of Matthew 4:18-22, Mark 1:16-20, and Luke 5:4-11. Each story has a different take on the details of this event, but all agree on the fact that Jesus invited them to join him. They left what they were doing and followed.

In Mark 3:17 we learn that Jesus referred to James and John as the “Sons of Thunder,” there is no explanation for this nickname.

St. John’s stained glass window photos are by Robert Fertitta.

 

Call to action: Share a smile with the community and enjoy all the smiles around us! Leave a photo of someone smiling in the comments section on our Facebook page.

 

 

 

MONDAY, March 30

“When I was a boy, and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’ ”  – Fred Rogers

In this time of distancing, there’s nothing worth celebrating more than the ways in which we can come together.

On Mondays, when St. John’s shares the Love with stories that spread compassion and hope, we share with you New York’s “Clap Because We Care” campaign.

In case you missed it, at exactly 7:00 p.m. Friday night in New York City, residents in all five boroughs cheered on our health care workers, grocery store and restaurant workers, truck drivers, sanitation workers, and everyone else on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, with a two-minute cacaphony of applause, cheers, hoots and hollers in gratitude for their sacrifices.

https://www.pix11.com/…/clap-because-we-care-new-yorkers-sh…

More awe-inspiring video here:

https://gma.abc/2JrCeu4

and here:

https://bit.ly/33Vcmjz

 

Call to action: Have you experienced an act of compassion or inspiration? Share the Love in the comments!

 

 

SATURDAY, March 28 

“Next to the Word of God, music deserves the highest praise.”  – Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

On Saturdays at St. John’s, we dedicate time for rest and restoration with music curated by Director of Music Peter Stoltzfus Berton.

This week, as we celebrate the Feast of the Annunciation, Peter talks about its connection to the Ave Maria, one of the most recognizable and well-known prayers throughout the western world, known to many people who are not Christian or religious at all and which has inspired leagues of composers to write some of their most memorable works.

The prayer is itself the chief Catholic prayer to the Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus. The text is said to be a direct quote from the Archangel Gabriel, when he descends from heaven and appears to Mary telling her she has been blessed to carry the Lord within her womb. The opening of the text is found in the New Testament, in the book of Luke, chapter 1, verse 28.

The 2005 French film Joyeux Noël concerns opposing fighters in World War I who come across each other on Christmas Eve, and call a cease fire among themselves. The brief unauthorized truce allows the soldiers to gain insights into each other’s way of life. This setting of Ave Maria, written for the film by Philippe Rombi (born 1968), is especially poignant in calling attention to the part of the text pleading for Mary’s intercession at the time of death.

One can imagine that, over centuries of war, millions of soldiers throughout the world have prayed this prayer for safe deliverance, spiritually if not also literally. And naturally, this prayer has had a lot of use in the past months around the world and will continue to bless millions.

The music ends in such sublime reassurance that it would seem guaranteed that the prayer has been answered.

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee.
Blessed art thou among women,
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, pray for us sinners,
now and in the hour of our death. Amen.

 

Call to Action: Share the music with those who might need a “change of tune” to brighten their day. Want to know more? Follow The Choir School at facebook.com/thechoirschoolri.org/.

 

FRIDAY, March 27

“When we give cheerfully and accept gratefully, everyone is blessed.” — Maya Angelou

On Fridays at St. John’s, we share blessings and invite others to the Way of Love.

This week, we were blessed with numerous families volunteering to make cards to send to complete strangers to let them know they are loved. Now more than ever, it is critical that we care for one another, our older population in particular. If you know someone in need or would like to get involved in our Marshall Initiative, please complete the survey (https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GQZ7FS5).”

In the meantime, here are some tips on how to specifically reach out during this time of crisis to help older adults feel less isolated: https://bit.ly/2vYiDyw

The Way of Love: https://saintjohns-newport.org/way-of-love/

 

 

Call to Action: Has someone positively touched your life during the pandemic? Have you helped someone in need? Share your stories!

 

 

THURSDAY, March 26

“Great opportunities to help others seldom come, but small ones surround us every day.” – Sally Koch

On Thursdays, we share the “Way of Love,” and challenge our community to “GO” share faith and offer service.

Today we want to tell you about the efforts of Ray O’Loughlin of Ray O’Loughlin Landscaping, and his teen daughter, who helped deliver lunches and breakfast bars to some of our Choir and Piano families. Ray recently added some of our Choir families to about 50 families he is delivering lunches to across the City of Newport!

Piano Program Coordinator Nikki Vazquez and Ray coordinated the effort, as some of our families are having difficulty getting around, with maxed-out resources, and this gesture crosses off at least one worry from their long list of worries.

Ray said he wants to give back to the town he grew up in, and teach his daughter the value of thoughtfulness.

In hopes to bring light into a dark time, St. John’s launched the Marshall Initiative — a formalized assistance strategy that uses survey responses to match those willing to assist with those in need of assistance.

To learn more, please take our online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GQZ7FS5

Call to action: Know someone that might be interested in getting involved? Or something in need? Please feel free to share this post!

Ray O’Loughlin Landscaping: https://bit.ly/2wDlblR

The Way of Love: https://saintjohns-newport.org/way-of-love/

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY, March 25

“God shapes the world by prayer. The more praying there is in the world, the better the world will be, the mightier the forces against evil.” – Mother Teresa

On Wednesdays, St. John’s Prays with Fr. Humphrey. Next Wednesday, we might want to pray for functioning video.

 

TUESDAY, March 24

“A smile is the light in your window that tells others that there is a caring, sharing person inside.” – Denis Waitley

At 10:00 a.m. on Tuesdays — or perhaps a little later in the event of technical difficulties! — St. John’s shares the Way of Love and we “Learn” to see beauty and hope in everyday life.

Art is a form of storytelling. At St. John’s, our most cherished forms of art are the historic stained glass windows that shine in the light and bring us hope.

Today, we reflect on The Presentation of Jesus in the Temple in hopes that by reading and reflecting on Scripture, we draw near to God, and God’s word dwells in us.

In this window, Joseph and Mary present Jesus in the Temple 8 days after his birth. Looking on are Anna and Simeon. Anna was an old woman who prayed constantly in the Temple. Simeon had been told he would see the Lord’s Messiah before he died. The Spirit led Simeon to the Temple, and when he saw Jesus he was pleased and knew that he had seen God’s salvation. His complete hymn is known as the Nunc Dimittis, or Song of Simeon, and is often said at evening services.

To discover more about the story shown in the window, go to the second chapter of the Book of Luke in the Bible and read verses 21-39. (Luke 2:21-39)

Each Tuesday, we will share a photo of one of our stained glass windows, explain the message behind it, and suggest further reading to continue the learning process.

Call to Action: Share a smile with the community and enjoy all the smiles around us! Leave a photo of someone smiling in the comments section on our Facebook page.

St. John’s stained glass window photos are by Robert Fertitta.

 

 

MONDAY, March 23

“When I was a boy, and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’ ”  – Fred Rogers

On Mondays, we pause, listen and choose hope. We “Turn” away from the power of fear and turn to the way of love.
Share stories that spread compassion. It’s possible to find acts of kindness and love all around us. Start the week with positivity, inspired by the news stories posted on St. John’s Facebook page.

UPDATE: Winner Winner says they’ve served more than 400 Buckets of Love dinners!

Call to Action: Have you recently experienced an act of compassion from a friend or even a stranger? Have you read or watched a story that brought you hope? Share it in the Monday comments section on the St. John’s Facebook page!

 

 

SATURDAY, March 21-

Share the Love and “change your tune” on Saturdays with inspirational music: